Don’t RAID-5/6 everything! – Part 1

It’s a beautiful Saturday morning … the sun is out, and the birds are chirping … and here I am, thinking about RAID-5/6. What’s wrong with me?

Anyway, have you ever wondered almost all your volumes are in a RAID-5/6 configuration? Like an obedient child, the answer would probably be “Oh, my vendor said it is good for me …”

In storage, the rule is applications-read, applications-write. And different applications have different behaviors but typically, they fall under 2 categories:

  • Random access
  • Sequential access

The next question to ask is how much Read/Writes ratio (or percentage) is in that Random Access behavior and how much of Read/Write ratio in Sequential Access behavior.

We usually pigeonhole transactional databases such as SQL Server, Oracle into OLTP-type characteristics with random access being the dominant access method. Similarly, email applications such as Exchange, Lotus and even SMTP into similar OLTP-type characteristics as well. We typically do a 2:1 or 3:1 ratio for OLTP-type applications with Read heavy and less of Writes. Data warehouse type of databases tend to be more sequential.

However, even within these OLTP applications, there are also sequential access behaviors as well, as the following table for a database shows:

Operation Random or Sequential Read/Write Heavy Block Size
DB-Log Random (Sequential in log recovery) Write Heavy unless you are doing log recovery 1KB – 64KB
DB-Data Files Random Read/Write mix dependent on load 4KB – 32KB
Batch insert Sequential Write Heavy 8KB – 128KB
Index scan Sequential Read Heavy 8KB – 128KB

We will look into 4 RAID-levels in this scenario and see how each RAID-level applies to an OLTP-type of environment. These RAID levels are RAID-0, RAID-1 (1+0, 0+1 included), RAID-5 and RAID-6.

RAID-0 is the baseline, with 1 x Read and 1 x Write being processed as per normal.

In RAID-1, it would require 2 x Writes and 1 x Read, because the write operation is mirrored. The RAID penalty is 2.

To avoid the cost of RAID-1, RAID-5 is almost always the RAID level of choice (unless you speak to those NetApp fellas). RAID-5 is a parity-based RAID and require 2 x Read (1 to read the data block and 1 to read the parity block) AND 2 x Write (1 to write the modified block and 1 to write the modified parity). Hence it has a RAID penalty of 4.

RAID-6 was to address the risk of RAID-5 because disk capacity are so freaking large now (3TB just came out). To rebuild a large-TB drive would take longer time and the RAID-5 volume is at risk if a second disk failure occurs. Hence, double parity RAID in RAID-6. But unfortunately, the RAID penalty for RAID-6 is 6!

To summarize the RAID write penalty,

RAID-level Number of I/O Reads
Number of I/O for Writes
RAID Write Penalty
0 1 1 1
1 (1+0, 0+1) 1 2 2
5 1 4 4
6 1 6 6

So, it is well known that RAID 0 has good performance for reads and writes but with absolutely no protection. RAID-1 would be good for random reads and writes but it is costly. RAID-5 is good for applications with a high ratio of sequential reads vs writes (2:1, 3:1 as mentioned), and RAID-6, errr … should be taken similarly as RAID-5 with some additional performance penalty.

With that in mind, a storage administrator must question why a particular RAID-level was proposed to the database or any like-applications.

I am going out to enjoy the Saturday now … and today, August 13th is the World’s Left-Handed Day. More about this RAID penalty and IOPS in my next entry.

About cfheoh

I am a technology blogger with 20+ years of IT experience. I write heavily on technologies related to storage networking and data management because that is my area of interest and expertise. I introduce technologies with the objectives to get readers to *know the facts*, and use that knowledge to cut through the marketing hypes, FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) and other fancy stuff. Only then, there will be progress. I am involved in SNIA (Storage Networking Industry Association) and as of October 2013, I have been appointed as SNIA South Asia & SNIA Malaysia non-voting representation to SNIA Technical Council. I was previously the Chairman of SNIA Malaysia until Dec 2012. I have recently joined Hitachi Data Systems as an Industry Manager for Oil & Gas in Asia Pacific. The position does not require me to be super-technical (which is what I love) but it helps develop another facet of my career, which is building communities and partnership. I think this is crucial and more wholesome than just being technical alone. Given my present position, I am not obligated to write about HDS and its technology, but I am indeed subjected to Social Media Guidelines of the company. Therefore, I would like to make a disclaimer that what I write is my personal opinion, and mine alone. Therefore, I am responsible for what I say and write and this statement indemnify my employer from any damages.
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One Response to Don’t RAID-5/6 everything! – Part 1

  1. Pingback: Don’t RAID-5/6 everything! – Part 1 (thnx cfheoh)

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